Archive for April, 2012

Dying a Hero

Posted: April 25, 2012 in Uncategorized

“To die for your country is sweet and good.” That quote can stir up a lot of different opinions depending on people’s beliefs. I believe this is right because I for one have a little patriotism in me so I would not find it a disappointing death dying while defending my country. So yes, I do believe it is sweet and good for two reasons, the first one being that I died protecting the people that I love’s well being and livelihood, and second, I died protecting the country in which I was born and had some great times in. These two reasons therefore say that I died a hero.

Dying a Hero

Posted: April 25, 2012 in Uncategorized

“To die for your country is sweet and good.” That quote can stir up a lot of different opinions depending on people’s beliefs. I believe this is right because I for one have a little patriotism in me so I would not find it a disappointing death dying while defending my country. So yes, I do believe it is sweet and good for two reasons, the first one being that I died protecting the people that I love’s well being and livelihood, and second, I died protecting the country in which I was born and had some great times in. These two reasons therefore say that I died a hero.

Even though I feel that way, people who have been in the war seem to disagree with me which is evident in quotes in All Quiet On The Western Front like “War is a cause of death like cancer and tuberculosis, like influenza and dysentery. The deaths are merely more frequent, more varied and terrible.” Also, there are quotes that can change someone like me’s mind like “He fires- the same moment a bullet smacks into him, they have got him.” Also showing how your friends can die without you even knowing ” There is jsut one little hole, it must have been a very tiny splinter. But it has sufficed. Kat is dead.” Another shows how people would rather die than continue on with life after being wounded ilke “If they take off my leg, I’ll put an end of it.” On the other hand, a heroic quote would be “A second machine gun bursts out. It is set up in a crater alongside us. Berger has fetched it.” That quote shows that people will risk their lives for their country and army colleagues.

Soldier Depiction

Posted: April 20, 2012 in Uncategorized

Image

I drew this picture because I thought it related to the uncaring personality that Paul and other soldiers developed as the war went on. In this picture, Paul is leaning on Franz Kemmerich’s grave while eating a sandwich with a smile on his face. This shows the eat or be eaten mentality that they developed.

When Kropp starts to ail on the train, they decide to drop him off at the hospital, and Paul, not wanting to separate from him, feigns a high fever so that he can go with him. At the Catholic Hospital, they get treated fairly well as to food and getting taken care of. One thing they didn’t like was the fact that the sisters would keep them up while they sleep because they were constantly praying. So they yelled at them to stop, which prompted the sisters to get confused and say things like “But we are saying prayers for you too.” Finally, Paul throws a bottle in their direction which finally gets them to shut the door. And since one of their roommates, Josef Hamacher, has a shooting license and and a crack in the head that leads him to say he received a “certificate to say that I was periodically not responsible for my actions. And nobody does anything to me.” So things turn out pretty well in that regard. Another event that goes on is when Lewendewski’s wife comes to visit him and that guys arrange a way for him to have her by playing skat loudly and watching their child for the time being. Also Peter, a man who was put in the Dying Room and promised to be back, and who they had “long proposed him dead”, came back and triumphantly took his old bed back. 

War Widow

Posted: April 13, 2012 in Uncategorized

War Widow

By Chris Abani

The telephone never rings. Still

you pick it up, smile into the static,

the breath of those you’ve loved; long dead.

 

The Leaf you pick from the fall

rises and dips away with every ridge.

Fingers stiff from time, you trace.

 

Staring off into a distance limned

by cataracts and other collected debris,

you have forgotten none of the long-ago joy

of an ice-cream truck and its summer song.

 

Between the paving stones;

between tea, a cup, and the sound

of you pouring;

between the time you woke that morning

and the time when the letter came,

a tired sorrow: like an old flagellant

able only to tease with a weak sting.

 

Riding the elevator all day,

floor after floor after floor,

each stop some small victory whittled

from the hard stone of death, you smile.

They used to write epics about moments like this.

 

This poem is written from a lady who lost her husband to war’s perspective. She writes of their memories and joyful moments.

 

The first part of the poem that I liked was:

“The telephone never rings. Still

you pick it up,” 

Here he (in a widow’s perspective) is talking about how she remembers him picking up the phone and wishes he still would even though she knows in reality, he’s dead.

Another part I liked goes like:

 

“Staring off into a distance limned

by cataracts and other collected debris,

you have forgotten none of the long-ago joy

of an ice-cream truck and its summer song.”

Here she’s talking about the joy’s her husband enjoyed when not fighting in the war. How even though he’s dead, the things he enjoyed are still there and will not be forgotten.

 

And finally, I like:

“from the hard stone of death, you smile.

They used to write epics about moments like this.”

The part that says “from the hard stone of death, you smile” is pretty much saying even from your grave, you are still the same happy, joyful person. And the second part, “They used to write epics about moments like this.” is pretty much saying that it was a happily ever after type of story since they would write epics (stories about heroes) about. This way she is also calling him a hero, because rightfully so, soldiers are heroes.

Paul’s Horrible Vacation

Posted: April 11, 2012 in Uncategorized

As Paul returned to his hometown in Germany on leave, he had a surprisingly horrible time. First of all, he comes home to find out his mom has cancer and family i struggling to even feed themselves. He is then hassled by his over-curious father who keeps asking him about the war and wants to show him off to his acquaintances. He is then met by many other people who want to know about the war, and then people like Kantorek who keeps making ignorant suggestion on ‘how to win the war’. At last, he has to have a terribly awkward visit to Kemmerich’s mom and make up a story about how Kemmerich died easily, when he actually suffered a lot.