Archive for December, 2011

Another Day, Another Poem

Posted: December 9, 2011 in Uncategorized

All This and More

By Mary Karr

“The Devil’s tour of hell did not include
a factory line where molten lead
spilled into mouths held wide,
no electric drill spiraling screws
into hands and feet, nor giant pliers
to lower you into simmering vats.
Instead, a circle of light
opened on your stuffed armchair,
whose chintz orchids did not boil and change,
and the Devil adjusted
your new spiked antennae
almost delicately, with claws curled
and lacquered black, before he spread
his leather wings to leap
into the acid-green sky.
So your head became a tv hull,
a gargoyle mirror. Your doppelganger
sloppy at the mouth
and swollen at the joints
enacted your days in sinuous
slow motion, your lines delivered
with a mocking sneer. Sometimes
the frame froze, reversed, began
again: the red eyes of a friend
you cursed, your girl child cowered
behind the drapes, parents alive again
and puzzled by this new form. That’s why
you clawed your way back to this life.”

All This and More, by Mary Karr is a very interesting poem. I like it because of its mysteriousness and way of keeping you guessing by not giving you all the information you want. It doesn’t tell you who one of the main characters/person being talked about is. This keeps you interested and curious about  the poem after you’re done reading it because of the uncertainty. It also might make you take a second look to try and figure it out, or even recommend it to a friend so that maybe the could have their own ideas as to who it is.

One of the lines I liked in this poem is:

“The Devil’s tour of hell did not include
a factory line where molten lead
spilled into mouths held wide,
no electric drill spiraling screws
into hands and feet, nor giant pliers
to lower you into simmering vats.”
I find this line kind of reassuring, even though it’s just a poem, it’s always nice to know that the thing that people are told is the worst possible place to go (hell) is not as bad as it seems.
Another line I liked is:
“So your head became a tv hull,
a gargoyle mirror. Your doppelganger
sloppy at the mouth”
At an earlier part of the poem, he says that the devil “adjusted your new spiked antennae” which kind of fits into the TV line in this quote. I find this interesting because she doesn’t mention who this person is…
I appreciated this quote, as well:
“the red eyes of a friend
you cursed, your girl child cowered
behind the drapes, parents alive again
and puzzled by this new form. That’s why
you clawed your way back to this life.”
This is a REALLY good line. It fills just enough gray area to quench your thirst, but not nearly enough to satisfy your curiosity. She says “Your child cowered behind the drapes” this tells us that this is a parent, possibly her husband. It also tells us that he’s probably in some scary form because the child is cowered behind the drapes. His parents are alive in the devil’s fantasy world, too. At the end she says “That’s why you clawed your way back to this life.” This can be interpreted in many ways, I kind of took it as if she made the whole story up just to insult him at the end by saying something like “OH THAT’S WHY YOU ENDED UP BACK HERE WITH ME FROM HELL. But that’s just my opinion.
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Posted: December 2, 2011 in Uncategorized

Adam’s Curse

By William Butler Yeats

We sat together at one summer’s end,
That beautiful mild woman, your close friend,
And you and I, and talked of poetry.
I said, ‘A line will take us hours maybe;
Yet if it does not seem a moment’s thought,
Our stitching and unstitching has been naught.
Better go down upon your marrow-bones
And scrub a kitchen pavement, or break stones
Like an old pauper, in all kinds of weather;
For to articulate sweet sounds together
Is to work harder than all these, and yet
Be thought an idler by the noisy set
Of bankers, schoolmasters, and clergymen
The martyrs call the world.’
And thereupon
That beautiful mild woman for whose sake
There’s many a one shall find out all heartache
On finding that her voice is sweet and low
Replied, ‘To be born woman is to know—
Although they do not talk of it at school—
That we must labour to be beautiful.’
I said, ‘It’s certain there is no fine thing
Since Adam’s fall but needs much labouring.
There have been lovers who thought love should be
So much compounded of high courtesy
That they would sigh and quote with learned looks
Precedents out of beautiful old books;
Yet now it seems an idle trade enough.’

We sat grown quiet at the name of love;
We saw the last embers of daylight die,
And in the trembling blue-green of the sky
A moon, worn as if it had been a shell
Washed by time’s waters as they rose and fell
About the stars and broke in days and years.

I had a thought for no one’s but your ears:
That you were beautiful, and that I strove
To love you in the old high way of love;
That it had all seemed happy, and yet we’d grown
As weary-hearted as that hollow moon.

I liked this poem because it’s called Adam’s Curse. Since my name is Adam, I had to pick this poem by nature. It made me feel a little weird because it’s about Adam’s (not me) awkward love for this girl. I mostly liked the title, but I also like how it rhymes and its nice flow.

I like “To be born woman-Although they do not talk of it at school-That we must labour to be beautiful.” because girls almost never look as good in the morning…

I also like ” Is to work harder than all these, and yet Be thought an idler by the noisy set.” because it kind of changes it up, you’re hard working, but, people think you’re lazy. Sometimes I feel like I’m unfairly judged this way.

Another phrase I like is “That they would sigh and quote with learned looks, Precedents out of beautiful old books.” This is true because people get a lot of their knowledge from books.